The Indianapolis Star, Jan. 13, 2011

Journal of the Print World, July 1, 2009

Register-Star, Aug. 17, 2006

The New York Sun, July 11, 2006

Art In America, Jan. 1, 2006

Memphis Business Journal, Nov. 1, 2002

Cheryl Pelavin Fine Art, Sept. 13, 2001

Art & Antiques Magazine, Dec. 1, 1999

The New York Times, Nov. 5, 1995

The Christian Science Monitor, June 29, 1990

Memphis Business Journal, April 1, 1990

The New York Times, April 2, 1989

Art News, Jan. 1, 1989

The New York Times, June 1, 1988

American Artist, April 1, 1988

The New York Times, Feb. 22, 1987

Princeton Packet, Feb. 13, 1987

Arts Magazine, Feb. 1, 1987

American Artist, Jan. 1, 1987

The Cleveland Plain Dealer, Sept. 25, 1985

Arts Magazine, March 1, 1985

Art In America, Sept. 1, 1984

American Artist, Feb. 1, 1984

Craddock’s signature style highlights the textural and structural details of her subjects—Southern willows, mighty oaks, Hudson Valley pines—even as it abstracts them.

— Edward M. Gómez, "Creation and Conservation" Art & Antiques, May 1, 2011

"A peculiar quiet intensity radiates from the landscape painting of Daisy Craddock, as much a result of a golden vision of sincerity, dignity and nostalgia as of the radiance of color and depth of field,"

— Fredric Koeppel "Landscapes draw on memories of Mid-South" The Commerical Appeal, January 9, 2010

The tension between expansive space and thin paint rubbed into burnt-sienna ground calls to mind Rothko. But rather than existential anxiety, in Ms. Craddock's evocation of an imperturable immensity one feels timeless rhythym and summery light," 

— Ken Johnson, "Weekend Fine Arts and Leisure, Art in Review", New York Times, Oct 19, 2001

For twenty years Daisy Craddock has used oil paint on canvas to survey the possibilities of landscape painting. She does not produce views on nature captured in the moment. Rather her subject is as much the process of painting as it is the observation of the actual place.

— Andrea Kirsch, "Two Places Recent Paintings, Drawings and Monoprints", Cheryl Pelavin Fine Art, July, 2001

"These are straight ahead landscapes with a modernist spine. If the landscape genre isolates them from the current Neo-Expressionist mainstream, they are also likely to outlast it."

— Stephen Westfall, Art in America, 1984